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AWD Mode Tutorial for Dummies

Tenacity85

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So, maybe I’m just not all that bright, but I can’t seem to comprehensively understand the “modes” and differential lock on my AWD (EX) Telluride.
So far, I have used Eco, Comfort, and and currently keeping my mode on Smart.
Tell me if I’ve got this right (if you know):
Eco - best for stop and go in the city kind of traffic
Comfort - no clue, but it’s the default?
Smart - supposed to figure out how I drive and adjust accordingly
Sport - the chances of me using this are slim, but if i device to drive on hills or gravel roads or off road use this with the lock button thingy? (I live in Central IL in the middle of paved roads and corn fields).
Snow - use when it’s snowy or crappy weather condition

anything I am missing? I’ve read the manual, but I really need simple, real world terms and examples. I’m not a car person, I’ve never had AWD or 4 wheel drive (I know there’s a difference, but that’s about it), and this new Telluride has more buttons and whistles than I’ve ever had to play with.
Any links to a good YouTube video?
Thanks in advance for the tips and assistance!
 

Robabco

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“Eco” and “Smart” modes deliver 100% power to the front wheels.
“Comfort” and “Snow” modes deliver 80% power to the front wheels and 20% to the rear.
“Sport” mode delivers 65% power to the front wheels and 35% to the rear.
“Lock” mode distributes power evenly to all four wheels.

Eco and Smart differ in that the Smart mode can recognize your tendencies and alter the drive mode somewhat over time.
 

Robabco

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There is also some modifications to steering response between Comfort and Snow, but I am not sure of the exact difference.
 

Gwyn

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“Eco” and “Smart” modes deliver 100% power to the front wheels.
“Comfort” and “Snow” modes deliver 80% power to the front wheels and 20% to the rear.
“Sport” mode delivers 65% power to the front wheels and 35% to the rear.
“Lock” mode distributes power evenly to all four wheels.

Eco and Smart differ in that the Smart mode can recognize your tendencies and alter the drive mode somewhat over time.
After watching the display in car, i would say almost accurate. Eco seems to be front end bias. But if you turn the wheel or the car senses some type of problems, the AWD will override the system. Eco tries to deleiver 100% of the energy to the front. But I have seen it deleiver 100% to the rear end too. You can feel the rear end kick in even in eco.

I think the listed specs is what it defaults to with out any input. But given input it changes dramaticly. Take the telluride on a curvy road, and have someone watch the awd gauge in eco.
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Robabco

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You are correct. The setting "expectations" are for "base" operation. There are other factors always at work, particularly with inputs from the wheel sensors. The vehicle will attempt to maintain stability based on those inputs.
 

Tenacity85

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Thanks for the input. That helps! I’ll have to find a curvy road or something with a hill and see what happens! I noticed the AWD gauge, and this explanation helps me understand the fluctuations, and I have felt the AWD “kick in” to different wheels in the rain on its own......now to find curves and hills in Central IL....hahaha.
 

Robabco

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You are likely to notice the "ESC" symbol flashing as well. This is normal and means the car has recognized that one or more of the wheels is turning at a different rate than the other wheels, and the car is compensating by using the anti-lock brake system to maintain equal wheel speeds. You may hear it feel a fast "clicking" sound as the various breaks are actuated and released several time per second. Completely normal - it means the system is working.
 

Husker Soze

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“Eco” and “Smart” modes deliver 100% power to the front wheels.
“Comfort” and “Snow” modes deliver 80% power to the front wheels and 20% to the rear.
“Sport” mode delivers 65% power to the front wheels and 35% to the rear.
“Lock” mode distributes power evenly to all four wheels.

Eco and Smart differ in that the Smart mode can recognize your tendencies and alter the drive mode somewhat over time.
I maybe wrong, but don't think this is accurate. I'm pretty sure Smart mode does some torque vectoring and provides power to the rear wheels as well based on driver input.
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blitt

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I maybe wrong, but don't think this is accurate. I'm pretty sure Smart mode does some torque vectoring and provides power to the rear wheels as well based on driver input.
I don't have my vehicle yet, but based upon my reading of the owner's manual and other sources I think you are correct.
 

BrianF

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All modes will deliver varying amounts of power to all wheels, some more than others. Eco and Comfort put most of the power to the front wheels, but some will also go to the back depending on driving conditions. Snow mode puts about 80% to the front and 20% to the back, while Sport divides it about 65%-35% front to rear. The Lock button is ONLY used at very low speeds (25mph or below) in very poor traction conditions (mud,sand,snow,etc.). With the center (front to rear) differential locked, you can experience “wind-up” and possible drivetrain damage if one or more tires can’t slip a little bit.
 

Robabco

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Torque Vectoring and other stability and safety controls (Yaw control, ESC, antilock braking, etc.) are mostly independent of the driving modes. I say "mostly" as they are not defined by the driving mode, but work in a kind of inter dependency. There are various sensors and inputs in the vehicle that work in a complex manner to determine the status of the vehicle stability. These inputs are utilized by the vehicle systems to determine what processes will be best applied to enhance stability. These include G-sensors, wheel speed sensors, steering status, etc. The programming is quite complex. There are many ways in which the driving mode will be "overridden" to ensure vehicle stability. The explanation of the driving modes was not meant as a total primer of these operations, only as a generalized response to the original question. Smart mode will shift between various driving modes during operation (ex.: Eco if you are driving gently to Sport if later you are driving aggressively and back to Eco in the same drive cycle). However, it begins its life in the driving cycle with a full bias to the front wheels - however, it can change during operation. It is meant to provide the most responsive driving performance, but also helping to improve fuel economy at the same time.
 

blitt

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As I saw in a video review of the Telly AWD .....”if you just let the system do it’s job, it will do it amazingly well in any situation “. Most likely , moving to “snow” or “lock” will only be necessary under extreme conditions.
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Robabco

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Snow mode will bias the AWD to the front wheels in most conditions to enhance stability. It gives most torque to the front wheels to "pull" the vehicle through the snow while minimizing the likelihood of "oversteer" from the rear wheels which can cause loss of vehicle stability control. It will continue to provide torque to the rear wheels, but it assumes that the desire will be for the enhanced safety of the front biasing useful for snow conditions. "Locked" AWD is useful at low speeds (for example to extricate the vehicle from sand or snow, etc.) but is not designed for full speed operation. In fact, it will disengage at approximately 25 mph. The vehicle will continue to monitor the need for torque vectoring and/or ESC and apply the appropriate controls - including driving the rear wheels as needed. The system is quite sophisticated. I would agree heartily that "it will do it amazingly well in any situation" as posted earlier - and faster and more adeptly than most drivers - and that its best "just to let it do its job".
 

RichGl44

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Most of these are very correct but the AWD is a different in house design by Hyundai/Kia and is not a Dynamax system, I know the Sorento had a capable system (Dynamax) whereas Telluride struggled but still made it (basing it off strictly one video in this incident)


 

ucinn

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The Telluride is offered in four trim levels: base LX, S, mid-level EX, and top-of-the-line SX.[8] The latter is offered with an optional "SX Prestige Package," which includes all-wheel drive, Nappa leather trim, a head-up display, heated and ventilated second-row seats, and other premium features.[9]

All Tellurides feature three rows of seating and, regardless of trim level, are equipped with various luxury-oriented features that are otherwise optional in some of its competitors, such as "Sofino" (leatherette)-trimmed or leather-trimmed seating surfaces, a touchscreen infotainment system with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration, SiriusXM Satellite Radio, and Kia's suite of "Drivewise" advanced driver assistance technologies.

All Tellurides are powered by a 291-horsepower, 3.8L Lambda II gasoline V6 engine paired with an eight-speed automatic transmission,[8] and either front-wheel-drive (FWD) or Kia's "Dynamax" all-wheel-drive (AWD) system (the latter is similar to the same system found in the smaller Kia Sorento).
 

Bear

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The Canadian telly model has a different AWD system than the U.S. It's called On-Demand System. Drive mode selector is: Comfort, Eco, Sport and Smart. Terrain mode: S Snow, Mud and Sand which can give you up to 50/50 split if required therefore can be driven at higher speeds. It is not a Dynamax system.
 

alexdrums

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The Canadian telly model has a different AWD system than the U.S. It's called On-Demand System. Drive mode selector is: Comfort, Eco, Sport and Smart. Terrain mode: S Snow, Mud and Sand which can give you up to 50/50 split if required therefore can be driven at higher speeds. It is not a Dynamax system.
The Canadian AWD might have different modes and be programmed differently, but there is no way it is a different SYSTEM. That would be prohibitively expensive, and for what?
 
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