Mass airflow sensor

ksyrah

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IMO - someone who doesn't know how to find a MAS, shouldn't be tinkering with a MAS :ROFLMAO:
It would have been quicker to google it than to sign up for an account to to ask the question.
 

Mike22

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IMO - someone who doesn't know how to find a MAS, shouldn't be tinkering with a MAS :ROFLMAO:
It would have been quicker to google it than to sign up for an account to to ask the question.
Thank you for the positive feedback. I was more looking to bypass the MAS to clean the fuel system.
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ksyrah

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Mike22

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I’m fully aware that it’s called a Mass airflow sensor. I was trying to find out if you can bypass the sensor to clean the fuel system. you can’t spray any cleaners directly onto the MAS. Nowhere did I refer to it as Mass Fuel.
thank you again for the helpful information
 

gavi0010

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What exactly are you trying to do? It’s a MAF sensor not MAS and they absolutely make a specific spray cleaner for it. Literally called MAF cleaner. As someone already mentioned it sits on the intake and is not part of this “fuel system” you are attempting to clean. So no need to bypass it unless you are trying to intentionally mess up your engines A/F ratio which is not smart.
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Mike22

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This is the first vehicle I have owned with a GDI engine. I know what a mass air flow sensor is. I know they make cleaner specifically for it. With most vehicles I’ve owned I could point right to the sensor. referring to it as the fuel system was not correct on my part. My issue is trying to clean the carbon build up. I purchased a can of CRC GDI IVD cleaner . knowing that it can’t be sprayed directly onto MAF sensor I wanted to see if there was a way to bypass the sensor.
 
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2020Telly

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Unless I’m completely confused, the carbon build up on a GDI engine tends to happen where the fuel is injected into the engine at the intake valves which are a separate system from from the air intake where the MAF is located. The only way I can see clearing that is with a fuel additive unless you are in the process of rebuilding the engine and have it disassembled.
 
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Senator20

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This is the first vehicle I have owned with a GDI engine. I know what a mass air flow sensor is. I know they make cleaner specifically for it. With most vehicles I’ve owned I could point right to the sensor. referring to it as the fuel system was not correct on my part. My issue is trying to clean the carbon build up. I purchased a can of CRC GDI IVD cleaner . knowing that it can’t be sprayed directly onto MAF sensor I wanted to see if there was a way to bypass the sensor.
You want to clean the intake not fuel. Carbon builds up on the intake valves since the gasoline is sprayed directly into the combustion chamber. to clean the fuel system you need to add an additive to the gas tank. I recommend Hot Shot Secret Gasoline Extreme. Yes, spraying anything after the Maf is a good idea. If you are really concerned I would find a shop that offers BG Services. www.bgprod.com. I am going to have them clean the intake when i hit around 30k miles. If you dont know where the MAF is by now i would not do this yourself.
 

Nac

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How do I locate mass airflow sensor on my 2020 telluride

You can look forever and will not be able to locate a MAF (Mass Air flow Sensor) on your Telluride....because it does not have one.

It uses a MAPS (Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor) and IATS (Intake Air Temperature Sensor) as described below.

Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor (MAPS) is a speed-density type sensor installed on the surge tank. It senses absolute pressure of the surge tank and transfers the analog signal proportional to the pressure to the ECM. By using this signal, the ECM calculates the intake air quantity and engine speed. The MAPS consists of a piezo-electric element and a hybrid IC amplifying the element output signal. The element is made of silicon diaphragm, which has the pressure sensitive variable resistor effect of semi-conductor. Because one side of the silicon diaphragm is 100% vacuum and the other is affected by the manifold pressure, this sensor can output analog signal by using the silicon variation proportional to pressure change.

Mounted inside the Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor, Intake Air Temperature Sensor (IATS) detects the intake air temperature.
To precisely calculate the amount of air, correction of the air temperature is required as the air density varies with the temperature. So the ECM uses not only MAPS signal but also IATS signal. This sensor has a Negative Temperature Coefficient (NTC) thermistor with resistance in reverse proportion to the temperature.

IMO - someone who doesn't know how to find a MAS, shouldn't be tinkering with a MAS :ROFLMAO:
It would have been quicker to google it than to sign up for an account to to ask the question.

Someone who doesn't have a clue what they are talking about regarding a specific subject (MAF/MAS) really should not be so fast to tell others what actions they should take (shouldn't be tinkering); nor should they provide the very poor advice "It would have been quicker to google it".

My understanding is that this forum was designed to share information, asking questions is how people learn. Providing condescending remarks just stifles the forum, and in this case makes you appear much less intelligent then you probably are. It would certainly not have been "quicker to google it", because since a Telluride MAF does not exist it cannot be found on google; I tried, apparently you did not..
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Mike22

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Thank you very much for the information. I definitely tried google and YouTube before joining this forum. My main concern was not damaging the MAS. Not being able to find the information was the main reason for joining this forum. Your reply was exactly what I needed. just the simple answer that the vehicle doesn’t have a MAS. This is my third KIA but my first with a GDI engine . Thank you again for the help
 

Senator20

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Learned something new today. Regardless of MAP or MAP, the OP stated they wanted to clean the fuel system. Spraying anything into the intake will not do that. I think he wants to clean the intake valves.
 

Nac

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My main concern was not damaging the MAS....
I do not believe the CRC GDI IVD cleaner will damage a Mass Air Flow Sensor (MAF), the majority of them are simply a heated wire and temperature sensor. They measure air flow by how much the heated wire is cooled. More airflow = more cooling resulting in a lower wire temperature.

Spraying something on the MAF wire while the engine is running would likely cause significant enough cooling to possibly result in an OBD code for the MAF signal. Which is why the instructions state to spray the cleaner past the MAF.

For the telluride, I would recommend removing the air intake as close to the manifold (Tank Assembly-Surge Air) as possible and follow the CRC instructions. Insert the CRC GDI IVD "perma straw" as far as possible. Since I have not used this product, I am not sure the straw is long enough to get past the Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor (MAPS) but if it is then get it past the sensor. Since this sensor measures pressure I do not believe it will throw a code if sprayed; however, the air temperature part of the sensor could be affected if it is significantly cooled. So if the straw is too short to get past the MAPS direct the spray into the manifold but away from the sensor.

Good luck and let us know how it works. The reviews I've seen of CRC GDI IVD say it's a good product and works well.
 

Nac

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Unless I’m completely confused, the carbon build up on a GDI engine tends to happen where the fuel is injected into the engine at the intake valves.... The only way I can see clearing that is with a fuel additive.
GDI = Gas Direct Injection, meaning the fuel is injected directly into the cylinder, not into the manifold behind the intake valve.

In a GDI design carbon build up tends to happen on the back of the intake valves. This is because fuel does not ever contact that area and therefore can not clean the back of the valve while on its way to the cylinder. In addition fuel additive can not clean the back of the intake valves because the fuel additive will never contact the back of the intake valves.

To clean the back of the intake valves in a GDI engine chemical or mechanical means must be used. (i.e. Walnut shell blasting or CRC GDI IVD spray cleaner)
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2020Telly

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GDI = Gas Direct Injection, meaning the fuel is injected directly into the cylinder, not into the manifold behind the intake valve.

In a GDI design carbon build up tends to happen on the back of the intake valves. This is because fuel does not ever contact that area and therefore can not clean the back of the valve while on its way to the cylinder. In addition fuel additive can not clean the back of the intake valves because the fuel additive will never contact the back of the intake valves.

To clean the back of the intake valves in a GDI engine chemical or mechanical means must be used. (i.e. Walnut shell blasting or CRC GDI IVD spray cleaner)
Thanks for the details.
 

Mike22

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Monday morning I was finally able to get to the telluride. I removed the air intake and used the CRC spray cleaner. I made the mistake of trying to open the manifold more than necessary. This made the check engine light come on and when you press the gas pedal it would stay at idle. After shutting engine off and restarting I was able to get the rpms up. The directions on the can say to keep the rpms at 2500. There is no need to insert the straw into the manifold. The vacuum is enough to draw in the product.

After following the directions on the can the check engine light went off.
the whole process takes some time. This is mainly because after you empty the can into the manifold the vehicle has to sit for an hour. After the hour is up you have to drive it at highway speeds for ten minutes.
 

Mike22

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In my previous post i failed to mention that CRC GDI IVD spray cleaner is specifically recommended for Kia vehicles . Their are several cleaners meant to remove carbon build up but this the only one I’m aware of that is recommended for Kia vehicles. Also I added a can of bg 44K to a full tank of gas a couples days before using the cleaner.
 

Husker Soze

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In my previous post i failed to mention that CRC GDI IVD spray cleaner is specifically recommended for Kia vehicles . Their are several cleaners meant to remove carbon build up but this the only one I’m aware of that is recommended for Kia vehicles. Also I added a can of bg 44K to a full tank of gas a couples days before using the cleaner.

I'm pretty sure that's just a marketing hook/sales pitch. I highly doubt that CRC made this product just specifically to Kia vehicles. Or maybe I misunderstood your statement.
 


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