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Self-Leveling Suspension

Kia Rocks!!

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I have that option, and I've had the option before on other vehicles. Typically there's an air compressor that inflates either bags or special shocks to lift the vehicle when it's loaded. Oddly enough I've never heard the compressor though, nor do I actually see anything under neath of mine with the exception of a hitch. Maybe someone can enlighten me? View attachment 1229View attachment 1227View attachment 1228View attachment 1226
The leveling happens within the shock. No air compressor. You have to drive 3 to 5 miles to allow the shock to adjust.
 

NCTelly

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Question. If my telluride doesn’t come with tow package, is it hard to add? What is charge from dealer?
In theory, yes. In reality, buyer beware.

There is a tow option that includes a tow hitch* and 4-wire harness and bumper cover.

Then there is a tow package that includes the tow option and a “self leveling suspension”**

All told you could probably buy the parts above online for just under $1000 and get someone to install for a small amount or DIY.

*The OEM tow hitch may only be rated for 351 lb tongue weight which means you should only tow a max of 3,510 lbs.

**The self leveling suspension is just some upgraded rear shocks (maybe upstaged spring, unclear) that will lift the vehicle up a little when it sags after you drive a couple of miles. Modifying suspension with an airbag or self leveling shocks with self contained fluid does not increase your ability to tow as this is determined by the engine and drivetrain which is the same on all Telluride trim levels.

So the downside is that you can’t get to 5,000 lbs with OEM (you can wait for aftermarket hitch they might be rated for 500 lb tongue weight. Even with the better rated tow hitch, unless you live in Michigan or Massachusetts (or a few other states) you can’t legally tow 3,500-5000 without splicing into the vehicle’s wiring to add a 7-pin (no easy connect harness option) and you have to add an aftermarket brake controller in order to get to 5,000.

My advice is to take a look through the many discussions on this forum as there is a ton of great information being contributed on this topic. If you aren’t in a rush to buy something wait a little while until there are aftermarket options in the US and hopefully Kia addresses their lack of guidance on the issue and inconsistencies in marketing vs the Telluride Owner’s manual.

To the moderators, it might make sense to have a separate area just for “towing” and move all the threads there.
 
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Lou Panozzo

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In theory, yes. In reality, buyer beware.

There is a tow option that includes a tow hitch* and 4-wire harness and bumper cover.

Then there is a tow package that includes the tow option and a “self leveling suspension”**

All told you could probably buy the parts above online for just under $1000 and get someone to install for a small amount or DIY.

*The OEM tow hitch may only be rated for 351 lb tongue weight which means you should only tow a max of 3,510 lbs.

**The self leveling suspension is just some upgraded rear shocks (maybe upstaged spring, unclear) that will lift the vehicle up a little when it sags after you drive a couple of miles. Modifying suspension with an airbag or self leveling shocks with self contained fluid does not increase your ability to tow as this is determined by the engine and drivetrain which is the same on all Telluride trim levels.

So the downside is that you can’t get to 5,000 lbs with OEM (you can wait for aftermarket hitch they might be rated for 500 lb tongue weight. Even with the better rated tow hitch, unless you live in Michigan or Massachusetts (or a few other states) you can’t legally tow 3,500-5000 without splicing into the vehicle’s wiring to add a 7-pin (no easy connect harness option) and you have to add an aftermarket brake controller in order to get to 5,000.

My advice is to take a look through the many discussions on this forum as there is a ton of great information being contributed on this topic. If you aren’t in a rush to buy something wait a little while until there are aftermarket options in the US and hopefully Kia addresses their lack of guidance on the issue and inconsistencies in marketing vs the Telluride Owner’s manual.

To the moderators, it might make sense to have a separate area just for “towing” and move all the threads there.
I agree we need to lump all the towing threads together. I heard back from www.trailerjacks.com They said they should have a 7 pin plug-in kit RV set up kit available in a month for the Kia Telluride. Like this one! 7 Way RV Trailer Wiring For 07-19 Kia Sorento 13-18 Hyundai Santa Fe 15-18 Sedona 07-12 Veracruz Plug Prong Pin Brake Control Ready
 
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chowfun27

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Huh, very interesting, wonder if the springs are the same between tow package and non tow package. Or would it only be the struts? Very interesting and pretty cool if u ask me.
I highly doubt the springs would be the same since the self leveling struts take some of the load.

I have a Saab 93 that had the Nivomat self leveling struts in a similar setup. I chose to forgo the self-leveling feature when I had to replace them because they were $500+ per strut. I had to change my springs to ones with a higher spring rate to compensate for the replacement non-self leveling struts.

Granted KIA is still around unlike Saab, I wonder what the replacement cost for these self-leveling struts are.
 
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NCTelly

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KROD

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If you read the documentation on the Nivomat shocks, it says there is a possibility of sagging.
Can't believe everything you read on the internet though. Id say if your concerned about the car sagging in all actuality it is no different than the majority of cars on the road if the springs get worn out which with age and mileage they will at that point you will have some sag but not the shocks blown you would just have a pretty poor ride quality.
 

alexdrums

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I guess since you didn’t read the webpage, you aren’t understanding what I am trying to say. The sagging is a normal (and not worn out) feature of these shocks. I took a picture of the relevant part of the webpage and attached it here. 46D529BD-B671-444A-A058-42461221DA94.png
 

KROD

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I guess since you didn’t read the webpage, you aren’t understanding what I am trying to say. The sagging is a normal (and not worn out) feature of these shocks. I took a picture of the relevant part of the webpage and attached it here. View attachment 1663
Well let's put it to the test who can measure the ride height of there non tow package and I'll measure one with the tow package and we can compare the difference
 

NCTelly

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Well let's put it to the test who can measure the ride height of there non tow package and I'll measure one with the tow package and we can compare the difference
Parked this is the height of my S FWD with no tow package and regular shocks: 32 5/8” with the yard stick centered in the hub from the ground to the bottom edge of the wheel well trim.
 

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